iDesign Sunday: iLike Concrete Ingenuity

When I think of concrete, my first thought is never,

“Say old chap, do you recall that warm and inviting concrete structure?  It was ever so pleasant!”  (you read that with an accent hehehe)

Nope.. Never.  Initial thoughts concerning concrete conjure images of “function driven” designs of abandoned factories and apartments, or cruddy steps and driveways.

A concrete apartment building in Hong Kong. The repetition is dizzying.

None of this really equates to beautiful.  And that used to be just fine because that was it’s initial purpose – to be a sturdy building material.  But architects and artists alike have taken concrete design to another level and made it not only functional, but beautiful, as well.  In my opinion, the combination of concrete and wood together can make the most beautiful designs.  This is the epitome of old + new to me (check my blog name, yo.. #oldworldnewgirl) because designers have combined an age old building material – wood, which is warm and inviting – with the newer material of concrete, and their experiments have yielded some gosh darn good results.  So here’s to those designers that looked at concrete and said – [caution: extreme corniness ahead] –

“By golly, I know what I’ll do with you today!  And you will never be like you were yesterday!”

concrete and wood bench by Rahim Tejani of Rock Paper Tree

concrete and wood bench by Rahim Tejani of Rock Paper Tree

Stained concrete floors are both beautiful and functional, and in this photo the flooring adds warmth and character to the room.

Transparent House designed some pretty awesome carved concrete flooring.

Y’all know I couldn’t do a post about concrete without showcasing the beautiful Concrete Lace by Doreen Westphal!

Exterior view of the Phillips Exeter Academy Library, designed by Louis I. Khan and located in Exeter, NH. (keep scrolling to see the concrete =)

Interior view of the upper floors of the Phillips Exeter Academy Library, designed by Louis I. Khan and located in Exeter, NH. This is a beautiful combination of concrete and wood which creates a warm and welcoming atmosphere in the library.

another view of the Exeter Library from the upper floors

Simple materials, sophisticated design. wood+brick+concrete.

Chichu Art Museum – “art museum in the earth” – designed by Tadao Ando. Located “in” the island of Naoshima in Kagawa Prefecture, Japan. This museum takes the old earth and inserts new points of view with the building being designed into the land. #oldworld #newvision!

One of the many unique views from the Chichu Art Museum – “art museum in the earth” – designed by Tadao Ando – Japan

Barcelona, Spain. Beeeeautiful factory, right? Watch what happens next, thanks to architect Ricardo Bofill.

The cement (a powder and main ingredient in concrete) factory turned home & workspace, designed and inhabited by Ricardo Bofill. Barcelona, Spain.

My favorite interior view of Bofill’s concrete factory turned home & workspace. So open, so many views, so much natural light! I would gladly inhabit this space!

So there you have it!  Concrete may have been purely functional in the past, but these artist, designers and architects have given this material a new and more beautiful purpose.  It is still functional, but it is designed and presented in more aesthetically pleasing forms.  Here’s to the boosters of concrete!  Check out even more photos on my Concrete pinterest board!

Happy iDesign Sunday, and until next time, Ci Vediamo!

*In the mean time & in between time, check out LA Active for a collection of awesome articles!*

Advertisements

One thought on “iDesign Sunday: iLike Concrete Ingenuity

  1. Pingback: Loft Living | old world new girl

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s